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In the world of websites, there is a growing demand for websites which are more dynamic and while you can create dynamic websites using a flat file database, these are not always the best option. What you are in need of is an object-relational database like that of PosgreSQL. This particular database management system is released as an open sourced development under the BSD license. In is not owned by a single company, but rather its development and future depends on a world wide organisation of developers who spend their spare time developing PostgreSQL out of their own pockets.

When this database management system was first developed, it was known quite simply as postgres, but as time went on, the need to conform and let the world know that it was a database system meant adding on the SQL part on the end. It was back in 1982 in which Michael Stonebraker would develop the Ingres project while at the University of California in Berkely. He would then leave the school in order to commercialise the project.

However, shortly afterwards he started realising that there were a number of issues with the database system and by 1985 he had to return to the University of California in order to start making repairs. The result of these repairs is what became known as the Postgres project in which adding several features and fixing a number of bugs in the code for Ingres, the start of the PostgreSQL object-relational database management system began.

The following year, Michael and his U of C team developed a paper on the system and by 1988 they had the fully operational prototype ready to go. In June of 1989, a few people were given the privilege of beta testing version 1. However there were still some bugs in the system so the team had to set out on creating version 2 which was made available in 1990. Over the next few years, while PostgreSQL was not very popular, a number of rewrites were created. This went on until just after the development of the World Wide Web and in 1993, the project became an instant success.

Unfortunately, this success led to a number of people wanting the code modified which overwhelmed the team at Berkely and so the project was shut down. Of course this was not to be the last of the PostgreSQL database management system as the University of California made it publicly available under the BSD license.

By 1995, a graduate chose to take the PostresSQL for one last major overhaul with a friend. The two, Andrew Yu and Jolly Chen would replace the original Ingres query interpreter with that of the SQL query language and as a result they created Postgres95. They then went and made the open source code available to all on the internet for download. The following year, Marc Fournier would develop a server for the open source effort and he would make use of the MPostres95 version making it the first non-university related website to ever use it.

The code was not very stable though and as a result he sought the help of Vadim B. Mikheev and Bruce Momjian to stabilise it and it was renamed to PostreSQL for the first time. Of course this also happened to work out to be version 6.0 of the project and was released in the beginning of 1997.

Today PostgreSQL is available in many different versions, one of the oldest forms is that of Mammoth PostgreSQL. They still get many large contributions which helps the world wide team to continuously develop the database management system year after year and while it may not be as popular as the likes of MySQL, it still holds an intrinsic value that cannot be over looked as well as having many options that MySQL does not include.

Original Authors: Nick
Edit Update Authors: M.A.Harris
Updated On: 05/03/2009

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