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In 1987, a systems administrator working for NASA named Larry Wall created a UNIX based scripting language as a means of making the reporting process a lot simpler. This scripting language became known as Perl and while it has gone through a great number of advancements over the years, it is still a high-level, yet general purpose programming language. Furthermore, Larry Wall still today oversees the development of the Perl core language even with version 6 soon to be released.

Using features that are associated with the C language as well as many other languages such as shell scripting and even AWK, the Perl language is a powerful yet highly robust development language. It allows for the easier manipulation of files in the UNIX environment as well as a number of potential uses such as graphical programming and even network administration. Furthermore, it is capable of accessing a database as well as using CGI which makes it an excellent choice for web development. The language is so flexible and can be adapted into so many purposeful uses that it has even been given the nickname of "the Swiss Army knife of programming languages".

While the first release took a bit of time, the expansion and growth became rather rapid and within no time new versions were being created and adapted upon. For the longest time, the only available documentation on the Perl language was an extremely large single page. However by 1991, the official book for Perl was released and known to the programming world simply as the Camel Book. It has and continues to be the de facto source for the Perl language and new releases and revisions accompany those of the actual Perl language. This book is developed by O’Reilly and on the book it featured a camel and ever since the very first release, the camel insignia has remained a symbol for the Perl language.

Original Authors: Nick
Edit Update Authors: M.A.Harris
Updated On: 30/01/2009

 


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